There’s a common saying when interviewing, “Act like the job needs you, not like you need the job.” For the most part, this quote is pretty accurate. When you walk into the conference room, waiting for the lineup of potential bosses and coworkers to meet you and assess if you’d be good for the team, you need to keep a cool head and pull a left turn: flip the tables on them. Make them want you.

You need to become the one asking the hard questions, to make them fall in love with you.

By flipping the script and interviewing your would-be peers, you’re letting everyone know that you mean business. Answering questions with thought out replies is a significant part of the interview process, but by keeping a few questions in mind to ask when feeling out how the team and company moves shows you’re thoughtful and that you care about the position.

Confidence and composure are what the team is looking for, not how your resume reads. By creating conversation, or bouncing ideas off one another in an admittedly awkward environment relieves some of the tension but also shows that you can assume control of a situation that you’re not entirely comfortable with. People enjoy being engaged, it’s not Pavlovian, but we react in kind when an interviewee volleys the questions back and thus creates an honest dialogue vs. a rehearsed call and response.

We asked some folks who’ve been on the hiring side of the interviewing table what they’d love to hear when looking for their next great teammate, what makes them raise an eyebrow or catches them off guard. In the world of the job hunt, it’s all about impact and standing out, not just answering what you think the interviewer wants to hear.

“The interviewee should have made time to conduct strong research on the company, role, market, and form ideas about how they will add value. The most compelling candidates do their research and ask relevant questions.” – Brian, CFO/COO

It’s important to come to your interview prepared and know the company, their space and what you think they’re trying to accomplish. By asking about how the company is positioning itself against natural industry evolution, it shows you’re trying to plan the next move and instead of trying to come from behind and jump in mid-stream. Granted, no one expects greatness overnight, but it helps to feign commitment to developing the future instead of relying on status quo.

Others are all about goals and successes, finding out ahead of time where you could fit in and what is expected of your role. By asking what metrics can be hit for the most effectiveness or how you can be a major contributor to the team makes a case for an objective-minded person:

“I want them to ask about team dynamic. If they aren’t asking about what level of autonomy they’ll have, what the feedback process looks like, and how we typically communicate, then they likely aren’t looking to be engaged in the way we need them to be.”

– Beki, Project Manager

“What are the KPIs for the position, how are they measured (if not obvious), and is there a bonus in exceeding them?” – Victorio, CEO

“I also now ask what success looks like for the role. And add a time frame, like six months. It makes the interviewer distill the real aim/purpose of the job. What they say first is very telling about what they care about, e.g., You have met all your performance targets, or you’re successful in your team, or you’re taking the initiative on new projects.”

– Claire, Technical Writer

Other questions are straight ahead and get down to the brass tacks, looking to strip away any fluff. It’s important to keep the smaller, more direct questions at the forefront, too. Every question doesn’t have to be a big picture narrative, there’s plenty of room for the inquiry that strikes to the heart of why would I want to be on this team?

Can I meet some of the people that I will be working with, or managing? – Heather, Writer

What surprised you most about joining this team? – Elena, Product Marketing Manager

Heading into your interview with a few questions about the position will only help drive the point home that you’re the person for the job. It doesn’t matter if you’re trading stocks, cleaning toilets, or writing blogs, the important lesson here is to drive engagement between you and the people interviewing. You want them to see you as effective, informed, and ready to be an impact player on the team. You made it all the way to the in-person round; they like you, it’s up to you to seal the deal with some extra pizazz.

And if all else fails you can be weird and ask something like “Would you rather fight 100 horse sized ducks or 100 duck sized horses?” We don’t recommend it, but Michael, a quirky CEO went there. Don’t blame us. We’re just trying to help.

SEE ALL ARTICLES

The gig economy is now a part of everyday life. Job growth numbers factor it in, and economists have established an obsession with trying to access the long-term power of someone being able to plug in for a moment and then drop out when they feel like it.

What many people assume though, is that for folks driving for Lyft or running errands for Favor, these jobs are their only income stream.

For a lot of people, this assumption couldn’t be further from the truth. Lots of people in the gig economy have full-time jobs but are using these additional income streams to pay off their bills. One of the biggest reasons folks get behind the wheels of their cars and pick up the groceries or the dry cleaning is simple: picking up gigs is an easy way to hack down student loans. A whopping 28% of drivers under 30 use ridesharing as a means to pay off their student loans.

GET YOUR RIDE ON

By adopting the famous Uber promise of “make at least $500 a week guaranteed” people are getting off work and turning on their driver apps in hopes to chip away at the mountain of debt in their lives that won’t go away. What’s worse, is that while most of us have debt due to owning a house, or a swollen credit card bill, there aren’t a variety of programs like Credit Karma or refinancing your home when it comes to student loans. Once you’re saddled with that payment, you’ve gotta pay it every month.

The average Lyft driver makes around $20 an hour, depending on the length of their day. In today’s economy that’s pretty good money for driving around town. For new graduates, that’s fantastic money. When you’re first out of school or have a degree in something that finding a job takes a little bit longer, the job market can get real tight, real quick. It’s not uncommon for working professionals, or the barista at your local spot have between 30-60K in student loan debt thanks to a crooked system of borrowing – and yet, somehow they gotta pay that debt off each month or risk default.

Because drivers make their own schedules, they’re choosing to pull a few hours a week. Nothing over the top, but enough to put all of that money away and into an account specifically to pay off more than the minimum due. Picking up around ten rides a week allows the drivers to get ahead of their bill and then move on toward bigger goals like buying a house or a better car. 31% of Uber drivers use the ridesharing app to make their house payments, proving that the side hustle is strong.

WHEN SHOULD A DRIVER GET BEHIND THE WHEEL?

The hottest times to drives is if an event is happening in town. People hate parking. Nine out of ten times, it’s easier to get dropped off than it is to deal with parking at any major event. Another great time to work is the weekend.

Because no one likes drunk drivers, the demand for ridesharing is through the roof. By working one weekend in a major city, that’s rent. And for enterprising drivers, that’s a major dent in their loans.

YOU’LL NEED A PLAN

If you’re already working and trying to maintain some semblance of a social life, you’re only going to pick up rides part-time. Because you have limited time out there, it’s important to set a realistic goal of what you’re trying to pay down a month. Start small because you don’t want to burn out. Remember, you’re already working a full-time job. If you can set a goal to earn $150 a week with ride sharing, that’s $600 toward your loans. Luckily, the interest rates are usually pretty low on the loans, so the typical payment is around $250 a month. By paying it off with more than double the amount, you’ll be making waves in the principal amount.

An easy way to get this money is to stick to a schedule. Don’t deviate from it, keep your weekend mornings open for folks on a coffee run or seniors heading to church. If you work during rush hour, then make sure you’re consistent, so it becomes routine. Because the money you’re making is more or less “extra credit” vs. income you need to live on, you’ll see it pile up, and when you make that big payment, it’ll feel good to see your ugly number drop each month.

FORGET BRAND LOYALTY

If you’re looking to make money, you can’t rely on one income stream. Grocery stores are doing home delivery or in-store personal shopping. Favor or Task Rabbit pick up and deliver just about anything you need. When it comes to ridesharing, there are the two giants in Lyft and Uber and a few smaller players like Fasten. Don’t rely on just one of these platforms, get them all. If you feel like going shopping for someone for a few hours, do that. If Lyft isn’t popping off, switch over to Uber and see what their patrons are up to. You’re in control of your financial destiny.

In the end, it’s all about how hard you want to hustle. You can’t work your regular 9-5 and then try to cram in 70 hours of ride sharing. You’ll go insane, and you’ll end up spending way too much time at the McDonald’s drive-thru. There’s an adage that’s been around forever, and it’s right in this case: marathon, not a sprint. Your loans will take some time to chip away at, but if you’re diligent and stick to a plan, you’ll make an impact, and it won’t come out of your regular check. Besides, you’ll get to meet some cool people in the process.

SEE ALL ARTICLES